CTYI Conference 2014

Understanding Gifted ChildrenIn Ireland we do not formally recognise gifted students within our education system. Most teachers qualify having had little or no training in teaching gifted students and, unlike many other countries, we have no specialist teachers in the field. This weekend’s conference at CTYI, DCU provided a rare opportunity to learn from true experts as several such speakers were flown in from around the globe to share their wisdom and insights. As usual, the vast bulk of the audience was made up of parents who, while soaking up the information with great interest and enthusiasm, were wishing their children’s teachers were there to hear the same.

These speakers were highly regarded international academic experts but each and every one of them was down-to-earth, engaging, entertaining and more than happy to answer questions and to chat to anyone during coffee or over lunch. A huge thanks to CTYI for organising such an interesting and uplifting day.

We believe the presentations will be posted on the CTYI website soon and we may cover some of them individually in due course but, for now, here is a rundown on who and what you missed!

Student Perceptions of High-Achieving Classmates

Albert ZieglerProf Albert Ziegler is Professor of Educational Psychology and Chair for Educational Psychology and Research on Excellence at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany. He has published approx. 300 books, chapters and articles in the fields of talent development, excellence, educational psychology and cognitive psychology. He is also Secretary-General of the International Research Association for Talent Development and Excellence (IRATDE)  Editor-in-Chief of Talent Development & Excellence.

Spatial Skills, Learning and Academic Achievement: A Scientific Perspective

Amy SheltonProf Amy Shelton   is Director of Research at CTY and Professor at the School of Education at Johns Hopkins University. She has PhD in Cognitive Psychology from Vanderbilt University and  is a postdoctoral fellow of the Department of Psychology at Stanford University.

Working Together to Support Your Highly Able Child At School

Niamh StackDr Niamh Stack  is a Senior University Teacher in Developmental Pyschology in the School of Psychology at Glasgow Unversity and Development Officer for the Scottish Network for Able Pupils (SNAP), providing CPD to teachers focused on gifted development. She is actively engaged in research activities related to gifted and talented education.


Dr MargMargaret Sutherlandaret Sutherland   is a Senior Lecturer in Additional Support Needs and is Programme Leader for the Masters in Inclusive Education  and the Certificate/Diploma/Masters in Inclusive Education at Glasgow University.  She is also Director of the Scottish Network for Able Pupils (SNAP) and a member of the General Committee of the European Council for High Ability (ECHA) http://www.echa.info/about-echa . She has written several books and papers in the field of gifted education and given keynote talks at  national and international conferences.

 To Accelerate or No to Accelerate, Is That The Question?

Lianne HoogeveenDr Lianne Hoogeveen is a Developmental Psychologist and Head of the Centre for the Study of Giftedness at Raboud University in Nijmegen, Netherlands.  She is involved in post-academic education for psychologists and teachers and in individual counseling of gifted children, youngsters and adults. She is a Board member of ECHA.

 The Role of Networking in the Life of Talented Kids

Csilla FuszekCsilla Fuszek Is Director of the European Talent Centre in Budapest, Hungary. With a background in teaching, Csilla Fuszek has focused and become specialized in the field of gifted and talented education. She has worked as a managing director of nationwide talent development programs aimed to promote equal opportunities to the disadvantaged and was the managing director of the Csányi Foundation which is one of the biggest civil education foundations focusing on talent support in Hungary. She has been a lecturer at Eötvös Loránd University since 2008 and since 2009 she has been working for the Association of Hungarian Talent Support Organizations. csilla.fuszek@talentcentrebudapest.eu

 Gifted Adolescents’ Resistance to Report Cyberbullying

Regina ConnollyProf Regina Connolly Director of the MSc in Electronic Commerce degree programme at Dublin City University Business School and has responsibility for postgraduate courses in Information Systems. Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Internet Commerce.

 Social and Emotional Lives of Gifted Children

Tracy CrossProf Tracy Cross Jody and Layton Smith Professor of Psychology and Gifted Education, Executive Director, Centre for Gifted Education, College of William and Mary, Virginia, USA  . He has published well over 150 articles and book chapters, and four books. He has been the editor of five journals in the field of gifted education (Gifted Child Quarterly, Roeper Review, Journal of Secondary Gifted Education, and Research Briefs), and is the current editor of the Journal for the Education of the Gifted.

 Perceptions and Practices: Gifted Education in Ireland

Jennifer CrossDr Jennifer Cross  is an Educational Psychologist and Research Assistant Professor at the College of William and Mary, Virginia, USA. Her research focuses on the social environment of schools and the development of attitudes, particularly those regarding social structures. She has presented at numerous local, national, and international conferences, and published in a variety of peer-reviewed journals, including Roeper Review, Journal of Youth and Adolescence, and Journal of Early Childhood Literacy.

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About Gifted Ireland

Gifted Ireland was established in May 2013 by a group of parents of gifted children in Ireland. Our aim is to pool our talents and experience to help other parents find support and advice in their local communities, to develop a strong and unified voice of advocacy on behalf of our children, to help and support those involved in the care and education of our children and to raise awareness of the unique social, emotional and academic needs of gifted children and adults. We are an entirely voluntary group and always open to new members and to collaboration with others who share an interest in giftedness.